Southeast Area Farmers’ Market hosts “Art at The Market” Sept. 20

Hollowell’s brother, Freeze, arranges prints for sale at the Southeast Area Farmers’ Market Summer Celebration.

Hollowell’s brother, Freeze, arranges prints for sale at the Southeast Area Farmers’ Market Summer Celebration.

Artists! Email OKTable1@gmail.com to sign up!

On Saturday Sept. 20, the Southeast Area Farmers’ Market plans to host “Art at The Market,” a showcase of local fine artists and their work. The date was chosen to coincide with Artprize as this event is not always accessible to artists from the Market’s neighborhoods or neighbors living nearby. Also, the neighborhood does have quite a few accomplished artists in its midst. Art at The Market will provide them an opportunity to showcase their talents, inspire their neighbors and share any messages that their art expresses. Artists already involved in Artprize are welcome, too! It’s simple to get involved! Simply email OKTable1@gmail.com to sign up!

Successful fine artist Derrick Hollowell has shown his work at the Market during its grand opening summer celebrations the past two years–and will be present for Saturday’s event. “The market is a real way for an artist to connect with the Community,” he says. “The casual atmosphere leads to personal conversations about an artist’s methods and motivation. It is a great way to find new collectors for your work, great vibe.”

Hollowell’s beautiful paintings have been on display at HopCat, Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital and Metro Health Hospital as well as in private collections.

The Southeast Area Farmers’ Market is open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays at Gerald R Ford Academic Center through November 8. The market warmly welcomes SNAP/EBT, Double Up Food Bucks (DUFB) and WIC & Sr. ProjectFresh as well as cash and debit cards.

Southeast Area Farmers’ Market and Food Justice

Mr. Henry selling organic collards, kale, mustard and sweet potato greens at the Southeast Area Farmers' Market.

Mr. Henry selling organic collards, kale, mustard and sweet potato greens at the Southeast Area Farmers’ Market.

While most farmers’ markets have a business goal in mind, the Southeast Area Farmers’ Market’s main goal is food justice. Increasing access to healthy food in Grand Rapids’ southeast neighborhoods is the market’s food justice goal.

Food Justice grew out of the Environmental Justice movement, where communities of color and poor working class people began to realize that their lack of access to healthy and affordable food was not the result of their own behavior, but of a food system that was motivated by profit. It’s not that our neighborhoods are food deserts. Rather, they are victims of food apartheid.

If you’d like to discover more information about food justice, visit the OKT website to see the entire OKT Food Justice Series. The series includes information on the Farm Bill, GMOs, food workers’ rights, climate change and food justice, the impact women of color have had on the food justice movement and more.

The Southeast Area Farmers’ Market is open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays at Gerald R Ford Academic Center through November 8. The market warmly welcomes SNAP/EBT, Double Up Food Bucks (DUFB) and WIC & Sr. ProjectFresh as well as cash and debit cards.

It’s time to register for AIDS Walk + Run!

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Rosa Parks Circle 135 Monroe Center NW Grand Rapids, MI 49503

9:45am: Registration begins

10:30am: Welcome and opening comments

11:00am: Runners start

11:05am: Walkers start

11:45am: Celebration

1:00pm: Event closing

Join The Grand Rapids Red Project for a fun 5K walk or run to support its life-saving work. Enjoy a beautiful stroll along the riverside (rain or shine) while supporting a great cause! Please visit the registration page and make a team!

At AIDS Walk + Run, we celebrate life, remember the tragedy of loved ones lost, and work together to raise awareness and funding in an effort to end the epidemic. A donation of as little as $25 can make a huge impact in someone’s life, even saving one.

This year’s registration donation is $25 includes a t-shirt and supports the work of The Grand Rapids Red Project and A.I.D.S Inc (Advocacy, Information, & Diverse Services). If the $25 registration is a barrier to your participation in the event, please email Brian at development@redprojectgr.org or call 616-456-9063 for the code to register free of cost.

New this year! Pick up your t-shirt the night before and join us for a special pasta dinner and cocktail party at Mangiamo! Friday night from 6 – 10 pm. $15 in advance (as part of your registration) or $20 at the door. We’ll have fun-filled evening of carb-loading and music before the race. For the festivities, there will be a cash bar on the lovely patio at Mangiamo! $5 cover for just the lawn party.

Thank you!! and Register Today!

For information and to donate to Red Project, please visit RedNeedsGreen.org and follow it on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.

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For more information and to donate to Red Project, please visit

RedNeedsGreen.org

and follow us on FACEBOOK and TWITTER

Guatemala: Mobilizing Against “Monsanto Law”

from Revolution News

BwjTHYeIMAEuUkCThe Plant Varieties Protection Bill passed in the night by the Guatemalan Congress in June during the World Cup distractions is facing resistance from farming communities and Indigenous Peoples from the Central American country, who warn about the risks of the regulation in terms of biodiversity and food sovereignty.

The bill–also known as the “Monsanto Law” because of the GM seed and agrotoxic multinational company’s involvement in its promotion in several Latin American countries–was appealed before the Guatemalan Constitutional Court, while different mobilizations were planned both in the capital of the country and in other departments on Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014.

Antonio Gonzalez, member of the National Network in Defense of Food Sovereignty in Guatemala (REDSAG) and the Latin American Agroecological Movement (MAELA) said in a press conference that “this bill risks biodiversity, native seed varieties that are over 7,000 years old and that never required patents or labs, but have been able to sustain the lives of the Guatemalan people. We are speaking of privatizing ancestral knowledge and one of the risks is the disappearance of the “milpa system”.   This is a small-scale self-consumption agriculture and commercialization system involving maize, pumpkin, medicinal herbs and beans, typical crops of peasant-indigenous agriculture in Mesoamerica and especially Guatemala. “We will no longer be the sons and daughters of maize, we will be the sons and daughters of GMOs”, said Antonio Gonzalez, who also denounced the actions by the government in favor of transnational seed companies.

Meanwhile, Glenda de Leon, also member of REDSAG, said in a press conference that the regulation will directly affect peasant and indigenous women, deepening the dependence of the food chain on transnational corporations that unlawfully hold intellectual property rights over plant varieties. In a publication, the Rural Studies Collective (Cer-Ixim) warned about the consequences of this “Monsanto Law”. They explained that under this law the possession or exchange of seeds of protected varieties without the breeder’s authorisation will be illegal and punishable by imprisonment.

It will also be illegal, and punishable by prison, to posses the harvest from such seeds or to save them for future plantings. According to the law, the breeder’s right extends to “varieties essentially derived from the protected variety.” In this sense, a hybrid produced from a protected variety crossed with an unprotected variety would automatically belong to the breeder of the patented variety. The law thus promotes privatisation and monopolies over seeds, endangering food sovereignty, especially that of indigenous peoples, said Cer-Ixim. It also warned that Guatemala’s biodiversity will fall “under the control of domestic and foreign companies.”

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The National Alliance for Biodiversity Protection has even said the law is unconstitutional “because it violates the rights of peoples. It will benefit transnational seed companies such as Monsanto, Duwest, Dupont, Syngenta, etc. ” “According to this law, the rights of plant breeders are superior to the rights of peoples to freely use seeds,” the Alliance said in a statement issued in late July. “It’s a direct attack on the traditional knowledge, biodiversity, life, culture, rural economy and worldview of Peoples, and food sovereignty,” it added.

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Virtual campaign

Artists and television celebrities have joined an online signature campaign to reject the law.

Their petition is addressed to the President, Otto Perez Molina, via the Avaaz website, and argues that the law is unconstitutional.

Call to artists! Art at the Market Sept. 20

Fine artist and DJ Derrick "Vito" Hollowell has shown his art as part of the market's grand opening celebrations the past two years.

Fine artist and DJ Derrick “Vito” Hollowell has shown his art as part of the market’s grand opening celebrations the past two years.

On Saturday Sept. 20, the Southeast Area Farmers’ Market plans to host local fine artists and their work at the market from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The date  was chosen to coincide with Artprize as  we know this event is not always accessible to artists from our neighborhoods or our neighbors living nearby. But even if you are already involved in Artprize, we hope you’ll join us!

It’s simple to get involved! Simply email OKTable1@gmail.com to sign up!

Happy Labor Day! OKT Food Justice hand-out addresses justice for food workers.

Over the past six months, OKT has released a series of handouts on food justice. Titles include: What Is Food Justice?, Women of Color & Food Justice,  Climate Change & Food Justice, The Farm Bill, Food Politics, Saving Seeds and, as mentioned in our headline, Food Workers & a Living Wage. On this Labor Day, we are featuring this last one below in solidarity with food workers and all workers earning less than a living wage.Click here to view, download and share the entire series.

Food Justice, Food Workers and a Living Wage 4