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49507 turkey give-away Nov. 21

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Don’t miss it! Last farmers’ market this Saturday

IMG_1119Saturday November  11 is the last time that the Southeast Area Farmers’ Market takes place in 2017. The market will take place in LINC’s parking lot at 341 Hall St. SE from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The market moved here three weeks ago due to ongoing construction at MLK Jr. Park.snap

Stop by and stock up on Southeast GR’s finest greens, local produce, cottage kitchen foods and more! As always, we welcome Bridge Card, SNAP, Double Up Food Bucks, WIC, Sr. Project Fresh and SEAFM Market Bucks.

Southeast Area Farmers’ Market open two more weeks!

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On November 4 and 11, the Southeast Area Farmers’ Market sets up shop in LINC’s parking lot at 341 Hall St. SE from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The market moved here two weeks ago due to ongoing construction at MLK Jr. Park.snap

Stop by and stock up on Southeast GR’s finest greens, local produce, cottage kitchen foods and more! As always, we welcome Bridge Card, SNAP, Double Up Food Bucks, WIC, Sr. Project Fresh and SEAFM Market Bucks.

Farmers’ market at LINC a success!

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Thursday market at UMCH,  9:30am-1pm, UMCH, , 904 Sheldon SE 49507
No market Oct. 27
The next market will take place Nov. 4
 11a.m. – 4p.m.  at Linc, 167 Madison Ave. SE  

Last Saturday, the Southeast Area Farmers’ Market set up shop in LINC’s parking lot at 167 Madison Ave. SE.  Shoppers began crowding around vendors’ tables before they even had a chance to set up. Yes, the location has changed but the vendors remain the same! Stop by for Southeast GR’s finest greens, local produce, cottage kitchen foods and more!

Due to ongoing construction at MLK Jr. Park, the market will operate at LINC on Nov. 4 and 11. The market will not take place Oct. 27.

As always, we welcome Bridge Card, SNAP, Double Up Food Bucks, WIC ,
Sr. Project Fresh and SEAFM Market Bucks.

 

Community discussion: “Building a People-First Economy”

defaultdf_linc_square6 – 8 p.m. Monday, October 30
Linc Up Gallery
341 Hall St SE, Grand Rapids, MI
Free

 
Local First is hosting Deborah Frieze and Aaron Tanaka from the Boston Impact Initiative.  for this discussion. They will share how The Boston Ujima Project has helped mobilize communities and build wealth and resilience by democratizing local investment, production, and consumption. This interactive workshop will walk participants through the creation of a neighborhood-scale economy that is governed by low-income and marginalized communities through creative interventions at every phase of an economic cycle.

Who would get the most out of this event? Entrepreneurs, community activists, and neighborhood leaders who want to see their local economy flourish.

About the Speakers

Deborah Frieze, co-founder of the Boston Impact Initiative, is an author, entrepreneur and social activist. Her award-winning book (co-authored with Meg Wheatley), Walk Out Walk On: A Learning Journey into Communities Daring to Live the Future Now, profiles pioneering leaders who walked out of organizations failing to contribute to the common good—and walked on to build resilient communities.

Aaron Tanaka, Investment Committee and Board member of the Boston Impact Initiative, is a community organizer, grant maker and impact investor. He founded and now director of the Center for Economic Democracy. He joined the Boston Impact Initiative in 2013 as the startup managing director and is also an Echoing Green Fellow, a Business Alliance for Local Living Economies (BALLE) Fellow, a visiting practitioner at Tufts University, and co-chair of the Asian American Resource Workshop and the national New Economy Coalition.

In partnership with Johnson Center for Philanthropy, Grand Rapids Community Foundation, Frey Foundation, and W.K. Kellogg Foundation,

“Big Hunger,” discussion with author Andrew Fisher

7 p.m. Tuesday, October 24 514jG80iVzL._SL160_
Cathedral Square/Diocese of Grand Rapids

Wealthy & Division SE
Parking available in the ramp adjacent to the Diocese building, entrance on Wealthy Street.

More information and a podcast here.

Food banks and food pantries have proliferated in response to an economic emergency. The loss of manufacturing jobs combined with the recession of the early 1980s and Reagan administration cutbacks in federal programs led to an explosion in the growth of food charity. This was meant to be a stopgap measure, but the jobs never came back, and the “emergency food system” became an industry. In Big Hunger, Andrew Fisher takes a critical look at the business of hunger and offers a new vision for the anti-hunger movement.

From one perspective, anti-hunger leaders have been extraordinarily effective. Food charity is embedded in American civil society, and federal food programs have remained intact while other anti-poverty programs have been eliminated or slashed. But anti-hunger advocates are missing an essential element of the problem: economic inequality driven by low wages. Reliant on corporate donations of food and money, anti-hunger organizations have failed to hold business accountable for offshoring jobs, cutting benefits, exploiting workers and rural communities, and resisting wage increases. They have become part of a “hunger industrial complex” that seems as self-perpetuating as the more famous military-industrial complex.

Fisher lays out a vision that encompasses a broader definition of hunger characterized by a focus on public health, economic justice, and economic democracy. He points to the work of numerous grassroots organizations that are leading the way in these fields as models for the rest of the anti-hunger sector. It is only through approaches like these that we can hope to end hunger, not just manage it.